Posts Tagged ‘Tower’

Down to Lisbon: Lisbon!

June 17, 2012

Lisbon from Airplane window

After our one day trip we finally arrived to Lisbon. I think it has a different feel from any other capital in Europe. In one hand there’s of course the good Southern Europe weather and sunlight illuminating it on the other hand there’s historical reasons.

Recent history has been kind in the looks of the city. While other countries were deep into World War II, Portugal remained neutral in the conflict saving monuments from bullet marks, bombing, rebuilding and other tragedies. The last time Lisbon had to undergo a major reconstruction was in the 1755 earthquake. Then it got the shape of a modern city with straight, large parallel streets downtown facing the river.

History also gave the city a cosmopolitan feeling. Lisbon was the center of a maritime Empire with colonies in America, Africa and Asia and you can see influences from distant lands in many landmarks, museums and in trees that don’t seem to belong in Europe.

Due to our errands we didn’t have so much time for sightseeing so I included some photos I took another time I was here in October 2010.

There’s plenty of photos and information on Lisbon in the internet but feel free to check our photos. There’s a photo I took from an airplane window arriving to Lisbon Airport showing the “25th of April” Bridge and the Cristo Redentor (a similar statue to that existing in Rio de Janeiro – Brazil).

Melgaço: Christmas lights

December 24, 2009

Here are some photos of the Christmas lights in the streets of Melgaço. Some of the photos were taken in the same places of previous Melgaço posts. Hope you like them, Merry Christmas everyone.

Melgaço: town symbols

October 30, 2009

The Tower-Castle

Melgaço Tower

Tower castle

The tower construction began in 1170 under the order of D. Afonso Henriques – the first King of Portugal – who also issued a charter with laws, privileges and obligations for Melgaço, creating the municipality.

The tower has a quadrangular shape isolated in the middle of a wall circle. The walls have two doors and are reinforced with three smaller towers with prismatic battlements.

In the XVII century, with the developments in artillery, some adaptations were made with the construction of bastion lines around the medieval area.

Nowadays the interior of the Tower is a museum open for tourists.

Inês Negra (“Black” Agnes)

Inês Negra

Inês Negra Statue

Inês Negra is part history, part legend.

During the years between 1383 and 1385 there was a period of anarchy and civil war in Portugal due to the death of the King “D. Fernando I” without a male heir. The ruling rights were contested between “D. João, Mestre de Avis” and the ruler of Castile (nowadays: Spain) “D. Juan I”.

Melgaço was under Castile influence when in 1388 “D. João” decided to reconquer it with his army. However the fate of the town was in the end decided in a single fight between two women in front of both armies: Inês “Negra” (supporting the Portuguese cause) versus “Arrenegada” (supporting the Spanish cause). Both women were from Melgaço, Inês was nicknamed “Negra” among the population due to the dark tone of her skin; “Arrenegada” was also a nickname and means something like “the hated one” for her support to Castile. Inês Negra won the fight and the Castile’s army left Melgaço the next day. 

Gallery:

Support this blog by listening to Blitzwood in Spotify.

Spotify

Clerigos Tower

October 12, 2009

Continue the path i followed in the “Trindade and Aliados” post: Here

The Tower is a part of the Clerigos Church and both were projected by the Italian architect Nicolau Nasoni and built between 1731 and 1763. It’s an example of the Baroque and Rococo architectural style in northern Portugal.

The Clerigos Tower is considered by many the main symbol of Oporto. With its 6 floors and 75 meters (246ft) it is the highest tower in Portugal. The entrance for visitors is located on the side of the building and for 2€ you can enjoy all of its 225 steps and of course a magnificent view over the city. The stone stairwell is tiring and a bit tight but luckily there weren’t many visitors on the ocasions i was there.

Be careful if you’re taking children with you because there is a considerable space between the stones that form the outside barrier of the upper balcony, luckily never heard of anyone falling down. I don’t recommend going all the way up if you suffer from vertigo.

Opening Times:

Tower

April to October (9:30 – 13:00 || 14:30 – 19:00)

 November to March (10:00 – 12:00 || 14:00 – 17:00)

 August (10:00 – 19:00)

Church

8:45 – 12:30

15:30 – 18:30

 Sundays: 10:00 – 13:00 || 21:00 – 22:20

 

Note: dowloading the higher resolution pictures will probably give you better options to zoom in and out.

 


REALTIME 3D VISUALIZATIONs

Powered by Unreal Engine

CATHERINE RYAN HOWARD

She turns coffee into books so she can afford to buy more coffee. And more books.

This Little Diary

and all the other little things

TRAVELLING THE WORLD SOLO

The ultimate guide for independent travellers seeking inspiration, advice and adventures beyond their wildest dreams

James Revels Composer

"And those who were seen dancing were thought insane by those who could not hear the music." - Nietzche

BillingMusic

It's all about the music

%d bloggers like this: